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. (engl)

CASEBOOK EDITION TEXT, NOTES & CRITICISM
William Golding's

LORD OF THE FLIES edited by James R. Baker Arthur P. Ziegler, Jr.
A PERIGEE BOOK This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents are either the product of the author's imagination or are used fictitiously, and any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, business establishments, events or locales is entirely coincidental.
A Perigee Book Published by The Berkley Publishing Group A division of Penguin Putnam Inc.
375 Hudson Street New York, New York 10014 Copyright (c) 1954 by William Golding Purdue Interview copyright (c) 1964 by James Keating & William Golding All rights reserved. This book, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form without permission.
Published simultaneously in Canada by General Publishing Co.
Limited, Toronto.
ISBN 0-399-50643-8 First Perigee edition: September 1988 Fourteen previous printings by G. P. Putnam's Sons The Penguin Putnam Inc. World Wide Web site address is http://www.penguinputnam.com Printed in the United States of America 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Acknowledgments A casebook edition of any work of literature is necessarily the result of work and good will by numerous people. We are deeply indebted to the writers who contributed the original materials contained in this volume.
We also wish to thank the authors, editors, and publishers who so kindly granted permissions for use of the previously published materials collected in this volume. Full acknowledgment for their valuable aid is printed in the headnote for each of the articles as well as original sources of publication.
The editors gratefully acknowledge the special courtesies of William Golding, J. T. C. Golding, Frank Kermode, Donald R. Spangler, Bruce P. Woodford, A. C. Willers and James Keating. The Introduction to this book originally appeared in the Arizona Quarterly. It is reprinted here (revised) by permission of the editor, Albert F. Gegenheimer.
For her expert aid in preparing the manuscript, our thanks to Mrs. Paul V. Anderson, and our special gratitude to Miss Helen Davidson, who not only performed routine secretarial duties but offered advice and kept spirits buoyant with her penetrating wit.
J.R.B.
A.P.Z., Jr.
Contents Arthur P. Ziegler, Jr.
Foreword ix James R. Baker Introduction xiii William Golding Lord of the Flies 1 James Keating-William Golding Purdue Interview 189 Frank Kermode-William Golding The Meaning of It All 197 Frank Kermode The Novels of William Golding 203 E. M. Forster An Introduction to Lord of the Flies
207 Donald R. Spangler Simon 211 Carl Niemeyer The Coral Island Revisited 217 J. T. C. Golding A World of Violence and Small Boys 225 John Peter The Fables of William Golding 229 Ian Gregor & Mark Kinkead-Weekes An Introduction to Lord of the Flies
235 William R. Mueller An Old Story Well Told 245 Thomas M. Coskren Is Golding Calvinistic?
253 Claire Rosenfield Men of a Smaller Growth 261 E. L. Epstein Notes on Lord of the Flies
277 Time Lord of the Campus 283 A Checklist of Publications Relevant to Lord of the Flies'
287 Foreword ARTHUR P. ZIEGLER, JR.
It is most astonishing and lamentable that a book as widely read and frequently used in the classroom as William Gelding's Lord of the Flies has received so little analytical attention from the critics. True, it has not been neglected; this volume attests to that. But despite the profusion of essays by a number of well-known and worthy critics, few close analyses of Golding's technique can be found among them, few explications of the workings of the novel will be discovered.
Indeed, despite a running controversy over the meaning of the novel, critical articles fall largely into a pattern of plot summary and applause for the arrangement of the novel's materials followed by observations on Golding's view of human nature, often embellished with the critic's response to that view.
There are exceptions they will be found among the essays in this book
like Claire Rosenfield's psychological study of meaning, Carl Niemeyer's comparative study of the novel and its antipathetic predecessor The Coral Island, Donald R. Spangler's penetrating study of the function of Simon, and William Mue




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